By Cara Dudgeon

17th January 2020

Larry Lamb has dropped a huge hint there will be more Gavin and Stacey, admitting he doesn’t think the BBC can “leave that one hanging”

Image Source/ BT TV

The sitcom returned for a Christmas special over the festive period and smashed records by becoming the UK’s most-watched scripted TV programme of the 2010s when more than 17 million viewers tuned in – and Larry, who plays Mick Shipman in the series, fully expects to reprise his role at some point.

Speaking on Lorraine, he said:

‘Quite honestly, with 17 million people that watched it, I don’t think the BBC are going to leave that one hanging.

‘I wouldn’t have thought so’.

Show host Lorraine Kelly asked him if he thought at the “very least” there would be another Christmas special, Larry replied:

‘Yeah’.

The festive special ended on a cliffhanger with Nessa (Ruth Jones) proposing to Smithy (James Corden) – and Larry would love to see what happens next by taking the show to the big screen.

He said:

‘The audience is there, and the BBC could put it out as a Christmas special and they could combine the two.

‘I’d be up for that.

‘I just had this feeling about it [the festive special]. I knew people were waiting for this’.

When asked if James had any “diva demands” on the new series, after he landed his ‘Late Late Show’ presenting gig in the US since the sitcom previously came to an end in 2010, Larry said:

‘Quite the opposite.

‘He’s enough of a regular actor to know if he starts pulling strokes like that among a group of people he’s worked with before it’s going to be, “Oh, come on.”

‘He wears his fame well’.

While the show’s return tasted huge success, attracting an average of 11.6 million people on Christmas Day, there was also some controversy as it received 866 complaints after the word “f****t” went uncensored when characters Bryn (Rob Brydon) and Nessa performed a rendition of The Pogues’ festive tune ‘Fairytale of New York’.

Some viewers who were “unhappy” that the lyric – “you cheap lousy f****t” – was sung during the programme, but the BBC have since defended the Christmas special.

They said:

‘While the word ‘f****t’ is now widely acknowledged as having the potential to offend, the song never suggests or implies that this is, or was ever, an appropriate way to address another person, nor does it link it to homosexuality’.

The BBC also insisted there was “no intention to offend viewers” by including the song’s line in the episode.

They added:

‘Nessa and Bryn were seen singing the original lines and we can assure you there was no intention to offend viewers.

‘We understand that some people will find it offensive in any context but we also recognise that the song is widely played and enjoyed in its original form’.

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